Clay Shooting Techniques

Swing Through

Swing Through 1
Swing Through 2
Swing Through 1
Swing Through 1

The Instinctive Approach

Your shotgun becomes a brush and you paint the bird or bunny out of the picture in one stroke. You want to swing the muzzle from behind the target and squeeze the trigger. “Butt, Belly, Beak, Bang”. Do not stop the movement of the shotgun at any time in this process or you will shoot behind your target. As you move the muzzle past the target and squeeze the trigger at the nose or beak, there is an unperceived amount of time that you actually pull into a lead position. Because it takes time for your brain to send out the command to squeeze the trigger and time for your gun to go through its mechanical functions to fire, you continue to move, pulling into an unperceived lead on the target.

Pull-Away

Swing Through 1
Swing Through 2
Swing Through 1
Swing Through 1

An All Around Shotgun Method

Mount on the front edge of the target and move the muzzle slowly away from the target – until you see a gap approximately the same size as the target between the target and the muzzle. Maintain same speed of the target and fire. Do not stop movement of the gun. As you maintain the same speed of the target with the muzzle (staying focused on the target) your target will seem to “slow down” or go into “slow motion”. and give you the control of the target. This is an excellent method for differing speeds and erratic target paths. The pull-away method uses your ability to point very accurately at any moving object. You want to focus on the front edge of the target, move the muzzle to it with your peripheral vision, now accelerate to gain a lead while moving at the same speed of the target, fire.

Maintained Lead

Swing Through 1
Swing Through 2
Swing Through 1
Swing Through 1

One of the Easiest Methods

Mount the muzzle ahead of the target using your peripheral vision. Stay ahead of the target with your focus stayed on the target. Move your muzzle with the target for a moment, matching the same speed of the target, adjust lead, fire. Do not over think your lead. A 30″ pattern is very forgiving. If you focus too much on the lead you will experience misses because you are no longer following the same speed of the target. Keep your muzzle moving the whole time as you stay focused on the target. As you match the same speed of the target you will notice the target seeming to slow down, that’s good…because you are now moving at the same speed of the target. Now you’re in control of the shot.

Spot / Ambush

Swing Through 1
Swing Through 2
Swing Through 1

The Rarest of All Methods

At times you may be in a situation that “spot shooting” is your only alternative. Having success with spot shooting requires lots of hours in the field for developing a keen sense of lead and timing. Most times a spot shooter will only have consistent success if the shot is repeated on a target of the same speed and distance. There is no lead, the muzzle is motionless. As the target moves toward the motionless barrel, at just the right perceived time the gun is fired. If you correctly calculated for speed, lead and timing, you will be successful. Good luck.

Fundamentals Reviewed

1. Focus on the Target

Focus-Point-Move in one fluid motion while staying focused on the target. Use your peripheral vision for all other movement.

2. Match Target Speed

Move the shotgun at the same speed of the target – the target will appear to slow down, giving you control.

3. Lead

While establishing the correct lead, keep your muzzle moving and stay focused on the target. A 30″ pattern is very forgiving.

4. Keep the Muzzle Moving

Keep moving and squeeze the trigger as one fluid movement – one fluid motion. This will eliminate shooting behind the target.

5. Muzzle Follow Through

Don’t stop moving after pointing at the target.
Don’t stop moving to establish lead.
Don’t stop moving when you pull the trigger.

Register Now!

Contact Us